Germanic languages are a subgrouping of the Indo-European language family and are broadly divided into the Eastern branch consisting of Gothic, the Northern branch which encompasses the Scandinavian languages and the largest branch, Western-Germanic, subgrouped into English, Frisian, German and Low Saxon/Low Franconian languages.
This category is for noncommercial sites in English about the German language. Please avoid submitting the following types of sites to this category:

If you submit any of these types of sites to this category, they will be moved to a more appropriate category by the editor. If you are not sure which category your site belongs in, you may submit it here and the editor will move it to the appropriate category.
Afrikaans is a Low-Franconian-Germanic member of the Indo-European language family spoken by at least 6.3 million speakers worldwide though mainly concentrated in South Africa but also found in Botswana, Malawi, Namibia and Zambia.
Danish is an East Scandinavian member of the Germanic subgroup of the Indo-European language family spoken by approximately 5.3 million people, principally concentrated in Denmark but also found in Canada, Germany, Greenland, Norway, Sweden, United Arab Emirates and the United States. Danish is also known as Dansk, Central Danish and Sjaelland.
Dutch is a Low Franconian member of the Western-Germanic subgroup of the Indo-European language family spoken by approximately 20 million people worldwide, slightly more than half of which live in the Netherlands with the remainder spread across at least 12 other countries. The Dutch terms for the language are "Nederlands", or, informally, "Hollands".
English is a West-Germanic member of the Indo-European language family spoken by 341 million people as a first language and more that 508 million in at least 104 countries.
This category lists sites that concern the Old English language, not the literature. Please submit literary sites to Arts/Literature/World_Literature/British/Anglo-Saxon/ and its relevant subcategories.

Examples of suitable sites for this category include studies of the origin and history of Old English, comparisons of Old English to Middle English and Modern English, articles on specific grammatical features of Old English, articles on the mechanics of Old English poetry, and studies of Old English manuscripts.

Submit bibliographies to the "Bibliographies" subcategory. Submit complete online courses in Old English to the "Courses" subcategory. Submit online Old English dictionaries to the "Dictionaries" subcategory. Submit complete online grammars of Old English to the "Grammars" subcategory.

Faroese is the official language of the roughly 50,000 people living in the Faroe Islands, an archipelago about half-way between Scotland and Iceland. Faroese is closely related to Icelandic, and less closely to the other Scandinavian languages (Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish), but definitely distinct from all of them.
Frisian is a West Germanic language still widely spoken in parts of the northern Netherlands (where it has official status), as well as by two very small (and disappearing) communities in northern Germany. Frisian is the continental Germanic language most closely related to English.
German is a Western-Germanic member of the Indo-European language family spoken by approximately 100 million first-language speakers and as many as 128 million people in as many as 40 countries. German is also known as Deutsch, Hochdeutsch and High German. This category is for noncommercial sites about German. This includes scientific considerations, educational resources, and reference materials.
This category is for noncommercial sites in English about the German language. Please avoid submitting the following types of sites to this category:

If you submit any of these types of sites to this category, they will be moved to a more appropriate category by the editor. If you are not sure which category your site belongs in, you may submit it here and the editor will move it to the appropriate category.
Gothic is an East-Germanic member of the Indo-European language family formerly spoken in Bulgaria, central Europe and Ukraine. The last known language communities survived into the 18th century.
Icelandic, also known as Íslenska, is a West-Scandinavian member of the Germanic subgroup of the Indo-European language family spoken by 230,000 people in Iceland and approximately 20,000 others spread across Canada and the United States.
Also known as Low German or Plattdeutsch. A group of dialects spoken traditionally over much of northern Germany and in parts of the Netherlands and southern Denmark, as well as by some immigrant communities elsewhere (mostly North America). It has no standard version.
Essentially, a Germanic dialect spoken in northern Germany and adjoining areas, or by overseas immigrant communitites, should be considered as Low Saxon if it has not undergone the second consonant shift typical of High German, yet is not normally considered as a Dutch, Frisian or Scandinavian dialect. The second consonant shift is responsible for High German forms like "Pfeffer", "Zeit", and "machen", where a Low Saxon dialect would have "P�per", "Tiet", and "maken", or something similar.
Norse is a West-Scandanavian member of the Germanic subgroup of the Indo-European language family used in Norway by an unsurveyed number of people. Norse is also known as Landsmaal, New Norse, Nynorsk and Norwegian.
Norwegian is a Danish-Bokmal member of the Germanic subgroup of the Indo-European language family spoken by approximately 5 million people mostly located in Norway. Norwegian is also known as Bokmaal, Riksmaal, Dano-Norwegian and Norwegian.
Scots is a member of the West-Germanic-English subgroup of the Indo-European language family spoken by approximately 100,000 people in the Lowlands of Scotland and parts of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. It is also referred to as Lallans, Doric and Braid Scots. In Ulster it is known as Ullans. A form with strong Scandinavian influences is spoken in Shetland, Orkney and Caithness.
Please submit only sites dealing with the Scots language, including Ullans, Shetlandic and Orcadian, in this category.
Swedish is an East-Scandinavian member of the Germanic subgroup of the Indo-European language family spoken by approximately 9 million people principally located in Sweden but with populations in Finland, Estonia, Canada, Norway and the United States. It is one of the official languages of Finland and the EU, and has a de facto status of official language in Sweden where it is the main language. Swedish is also known as Svenska (in Swedish) and Ruotsi (in Finnish).
The Yiddish language, closely related to German but written in the Hebrew alphabet, is spoken by Northern and Eastern European Jews and by their descendants worldwide.