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The name Connecticut is derived from the Native American designation of Quenticut, meaning "long tidal river".

The Connecticut River flows from the U.S.-Canadian border to Long Island Sound, its 410 miles creating the border between Vermont and New Hampshire, and traversing the midsections of Massachusetts and Connecticut.

In the early days, the river was a main thoroughfare of transportation for the entire New England region. The river provided rich natural resources and a fertile flood plan so that agriculture thrived. The water power of the river and its tributaries allowed a booming Industrial Revolution and growth of towns along its banks. It was on the Connecticut River that the first steamboat was invented and the first submarine was launched.

The Connecticut River is designated as an American Heritage River.


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Photos and information from ConnecticutHistory.org.
Advocacy organization provides information on protecting clean water, restoring healthy river, recreation and working partners.
Comprised of representatives from New Hampshire and Vermont. Subcomittee information and news.
Features permanent and changing exhibitions on the maritime, economic and cultural history of the Connecticut River valley from Canada to Long Island. Includes hours, admission rates, membership details, educational programs, links and directions.
Interactive map and information on primitive campsites and access points along the river.
Article by Julie Leibach published in the November-December 2012 issue of Audubon Magazine.
Map and information on the watershed that flows from the Canadian border to Long Island Sound.
Reprint of April 2002 article from The Christian Science Monitor.
Article published by Reeve Gutsell in the Daily Hampshire Gazette.
Contemporary color photos and information on the Connecticut River at the point where its banks flow past the state capitol.
Map and information on the watershed that flows from the Canadian border to Long Island Sound.
Comprised of representatives from New Hampshire and Vermont. Subcomittee information and news.
Article published by Reeve Gutsell in the Daily Hampshire Gazette.
Features permanent and changing exhibitions on the maritime, economic and cultural history of the Connecticut River valley from Canada to Long Island. Includes hours, admission rates, membership details, educational programs, links and directions.
Photos and information from ConnecticutHistory.org.
Contemporary color photos and information on the Connecticut River at the point where its banks flow past the state capitol.
Interactive map and information on primitive campsites and access points along the river.
Article by Julie Leibach published in the November-December 2012 issue of Audubon Magazine.
Advocacy organization provides information on protecting clean water, restoring healthy river, recreation and working partners.
Reprint of April 2002 article from The Christian Science Monitor.
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November 28, 2021 at 6:25:20 UTC
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